Downloadable
Assessment Tool

Download the Superintendent's Assessment Tool from MovingYourNumbers.orgDownload the Superintendent's Assessment Tool and stay on track.

(Interactive PDF | 3D eReader)

Questions?
Call 614.846.4080 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

There is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of six practices described in the collective work of Moving Your Numbers, a technical assistance and dissemination initiative of the National Center on Educational Outcomes designed to identify and provide existence proofs of districts improving outcomes for all learners as part of district-wide improvement efforts. These practices, when used in an aligned and coherent manner, are associated with higher student achievement:

  1. Use data well and in an ongoing way;
  2. Focus your goals;
  3. Select and implement shared instructional practices;
  4. Implement deeply;
  5. Monitor and provide feedback and support; and
  6. Inquire, learn, and build capacity (McNulty & Besser, 2011).

View the Moving Your Numbers document,
A Synthesis of Lessons Learned

They are also aligned with the essential practices delineated in Ohio’s Leadership Development Framework and can be supported by using the structures and tools embedded in the Ohio Improvement Process. In essence, they combine the essential practices identified by the Ohio Leadership Advisory Council, while providing support for the use of a structured process (i.e., the OIP) to operationalize those practices and support sustainable improvement on a district-wide basis. A brief description of each practice, drawn from Moving Your Numbers case studies, follows:

Use data well and in an ongoing way

Effective districts and their schools make data use for instructional improvement a district-wide priority and expectation for all staff. They develop district-wide processes that allow for more collective use of relevant data to make smarter decisions, including he ongoing assessment of teaching and learning at the classroom, school, and district levels. These processes include the implementation and ongoing use of teacher-developed formative assessments to support shared instructional practice. These districts provide support, such as professional development (PD) to all personnel in effective data use, and use data as a form of feedback to the district on the effectiveness of adult professional practice in improving student learning [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #1 and 3] 2 Focus your goals – effective districts and their schools focus their core.

Focus your goals

Effective districts and their schools focus their core work in teaching and learning around a limited number of important goals and strategies, based on the identification of critical needs. Such districts know that to combat what Reeves (2006) calls “initiative fatigue” and what Fullan (2006) has described as “repetitive change syndrome,” they must focus on a few critical things well. Robinson, et al. (2008) identified goal setting as one of the most critical district/school leadership responsibilities. Effective districts engage personnel and stakeholders from all levels of the system in shaping and identifying with the district’s focus, ensure that all schools in the district align their work with district-established goals and strategies, and limit the number of priorities to increase the capacity for district-wide implementation. They clearly define the role of central office and principals to be about the improvement of instructional practice and student learning, and they actively work with the Board of Education and members of the community to sustain the focus on supporting higher student achievement [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #2, 4, 5, and 6].

Select and implement shared instructional practices

Effective districts and their schools use specific instructional practices as part of the district improvement process. Often the use of effective instructional practices involves the use of collaborative structures (e.g., teacher-based teams) as a mechanism for teachers and other instructional personnel to inform each other’s practice, thereby increasing the district’s collective capacity to identify and meet the needs of all learners. Effective districts and their schools hold all adults in the district to high standards, clearly defining expectations around the core work of teaching and learning, develop a common vocabulary for what constitutes high-quality instructional practice, embed ongoing PD as part of the work of collaborative teams, and provide structured opportunities for principals and schools, in addition to teachers, to learn from one another. They make it clear to all personnel that they have a role in implementation of the non-negotiable strategies identified by the district [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #2 and 3].

Implement deeply

Effective districts and their schools move from a focus on individual schools to a focus on district-wide implementation of identified practices, putting those structures into place necessary to support ongoing, high-quality implementation. They define what full implementation looks like, and are intentional in delivering targeted PD and aligning other district resources (e.g., time, money) to support implementation of identified practices. They also engage in ongoing self-assessment of instructional practice as a district through the use of aligned team structures (e.g., district leadership team, school-level leadership teams, teacher teams) and customized protocols that facilitated team discussion within and across levels of the district [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #1, 2, 3, and 5].

Monitor and provide feedback and support

Effective districts and their schools monitor their degree of implementation of identified practices, constantly evaluating whether such implementation is resulting in improvements in student learning. The collection and reporting of these data serve as a feedback loop to staff on the overall implementation level of the strategies and is described by Reeves (2006) as an inquiry process that is the most critical component of district and school continuous improvement. Districts that understand the importance of monitoring use a consistent set of procedures and protocols in measuring both adult implementation and student achievement to gauge the effect of district actions on student performance. They provide feedback to principals and school-level teams, modeling the type of feedback principals and building leadership teams are expected to provide to teachers and teacher-based teams. They are intentional in identifying and replicating successful practices on a district-wide basis [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #1, 2, 3, and 6].

Inquire, learn, and build capacity

Effective districts and their schools use an active inquiry process to evaluate their own practice. The follow-through and application of what is learned by adults through jobembedded and targeted PD are evaluated so that improvements in implementation can be made and supported in more focused ways. These districts establish parameters for making decisions about needed changes to the district’s improvement strategies, engage all personnel in continually evaluating the effect of the district’s core work on student learning and district/school performance, align resources to support priorities, and communicate and foster a sense of urgency for continuous improvement and positive change [this area is directly aligned with OLAC Areas #1, 2, 3, 5, and 6].

To learn more about districts featured in the Moving Your Numbers work, go to www.movingyournumbers.org

To establish a baseline level of implementation of each of these areas of practice for your district, work as a District Leadership Team (DLT) to complete the District Self-Assessment Guide for Moving Our Numbers. This tool, developed by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), can be used periodically to spur discussion among team members and to gauge changes in implementation practices.

Download the Moving Your Numbers
District Self-Assessment Guide

Interactive Assessment Tool

Download the Superintendent's Assessment Tool from MovingYourNumbers.org

This District Self-Assessment Guide is intended for use by district leadership teams and school-level leadership teams in gauging the district's degree of implementation and scale of actions associated with effective practices identified by Moving Your Numbers.

(Note: You must have javascript enabled in your Adobe Reader to take full advantage of the Interactive PDF)

 

Supporting Partners

  • University of Dayton, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program
  • Educational Service Center of Cuyahoga County, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program
  • State Support Team 3, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program
  • Ohio Department of Education, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program
  • Buckeye Association of School Administrators, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program
  • Ohio Leadership Advisory Council, a supporting partner of the Ohio Doing What Works program

©2016, UD SEHS Grant Center, in cooperation with the ESC of Cuyahoga County. All Rights Reserved.